Tag Archives: startup

What does the “typical” startup look like?

by Rieva Lesonsky for score.org

What-Does-the-Average-Startup-Look-Like

More than other countries in a recent global survey, Americans actually make good on their intentions to start businesses.

There’s good news about entrepreneurship in the United States: It’s on the rise. According to the just released 2014 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) from Babson College, 14 percent of Americans were involved in starting or running a new business last year. That’s the highest rate of entrepreneurship the Monitor has recorded since 1999—the height of the dotcom boom.

Americans seem to have recovered from their recession-driven fears that caused the rate of new business startups to take a nosedive in recent years—12 percent of those surveyed plan to start a new business.  Continue reading

SBA launches ‘Startup in a Day’ initiative.

By Maria Contreras-Sweet, SBA Administrator

Maria Contreras-SweetWhen I started my businesses, it was overwhelming. I had to set up a legal structure, find office space, learn local zoning laws, apply for multiple licenses and permits, and navigate a maze of city, county, state and federal requirements before I could even open my doors.

The process shouldn’t be so difficult and time-consuming.

That’s why I’m proud to join the White House in announcing the launch of our Startup in a Day initiative, in alliance with the National League of Cities.  Continue reading

What’s more important to business strategy, predicting change or the lack of change?

Jeff Bezos as quoted by Bill Gurley:

“I very frequently get the question: ‘What’s going to change in the next 10 years?’ And that is a very interesting question; it’s a very common one. I almost never get the question: ‘What’s not going to change in the next 10 years?’ And I submit to you that that second question is actually the more important of the two — because you can build a business strategy around the things that are stable in time. … [I]n our retail business, we know that customers want low prices, and I know that’s going to be true 10 years from now. They want fast delivery; they want vast selection. It’s impossible to imagine a future 10 years from now where a customer comes up and says, ‘Jeff I love Amazon; I just wish the prices were a little higher,’ [or] ‘I love Amazon; I just wish you’d deliver a little more slowly.’ Impossible. And so the effort we put into those things, spinning those things up, we know the energy we put into it today will still be paying off dividends for our customers 10 years from now. When you have something that you know is true, even over the long term, you can afford to put a lot of energy into it.”

Read more on VentureBeat…

Should my new company have co-founders?

From the Kauffman Founders School…

Once a decision is made to found a company, one of the first and most important decisions concerns whether to “go solo” or to form a founding team. There are good reasons to form a team, but it is essential to address the question: with whom should I found? Read more.

Ask SCORE: What’s the key to having a good business plan?

A: Embrace the process, not just the plan. 

by Ken Sethney, Kitsap SCORE

Strategic planning isn’t just an option for small businesses today; it’s essential. Given the uncertain direction of some trends and the rapid pace of change in others, every small business needs some kind of roadmap by which to navigate these shifting environment and the right metrics to accurately gauge progress towards business goals.

But while most small businesses know they have to plan, few know how to do it correctly.

Writing in American Express OPEN Forum, management consultant Les McKeown says that while he’s seen virtually every type of strategic planning process, “many times, those involved in the process place too much importance in the resulting plans, and far too little in the planning process itself.” McKeown, president and CEO of Predictable Success, explains that the point of planning is “to develop an understanding of what’s likely to happen in the future and to be fully prepared for most circumstances.”  Continue reading