Category Archives: SBA

5 Key Financial Tips When Starting a Business from Home

By Marco Carbajo

Did you know more than 52% of all small businesses in the U.S. are home based?

According to the Small Business Administration, there are more than 28 million small businesses in the United States, making up 99.7 percent of all U.S. businesses.

If you are considering or are in the process of starting a business from home, it’s an exciting and important undertaking. And as with any venture, it’s crucial to take the right steps to set yourself up for success.

Part of making sure you follow the necessary steps when starting a business from home can set the foundation needed to be successful. Here are five key financial tips to follow when starting a business from home.  Continue reading

Are unnecessary rules & regulations impacting your small business?

Federal Register Notice Banner

Tell the SBA your story. You can make a difference in how the SBA does business.

Now through Oct. 16 at www.sba.gov/ReducingRegs, the SBA is collecting comments from small businesses to help the agency identify unnecessary or ineffective rules and regulations that stifle business growth.

“As I travel the country meeting with small business owners, I hear over and over again about the volume of regulations they must comply with and how difficult it is to manage the burden,” SBA Administrator Linda McMahon said. “So I’ve appointed a taskforce here at SBA to help identify SBA regulations that need to be changed or eliminated. Your feedback will help SBA do its part to identify which SBA regulations may be impeding small business economic growth, innovation and job creation.”

The Federal Register notice posted earlier this month is in response to President Trump’s Executive Order 13777 which aims to ease the burdens placed on America’s small businesses. Under this Executive Order all federal agencies are required to designate a Regulatory Reform Officer and develop a process of evaluating their existing regulations and determine which ones should be repealed, replaced or modified.

Visit www.sba.gov/ReducingRegs for more information and to post your comments.

Are unnecessary policies and rules impacting your small business growth?

Tell the SBA your story.

Now through Oct. 16 at www.sba.gov/ReducingRegs, the SBA is collecting comments from small businesses to help the agency identify unnecessary or ineffective rules and regulations that stifle business growth.

“As I travel the country meeting with small business owners, I hear over and over again about the volume of regulations they must comply with and how difficult it is to manage the burden,” SBA Administrator Linda McMahon said. “So I’ve appointed a taskforce here at SBA to help identify SBA regulations that need to be changed or eliminated. Your feedback will help SBA do its part to identify which SBA regulations may be impeding small business economic growth, innovation and job creation.”

The Federal Register notice posted earlier this month is in response to President Trump’s Executive Order 13777 which aims to ease the burdens placed on America’s small businesses. Under this Executive Order all federal agencies are required to designate a Regulatory Reform Officer and develop a process of evaluating their existing regulations and determine which ones should be repealed, replaced or modified.

Visit www.sba.gov/ReducingRegs for more information and to post your comments.

8 things you can do to be taken seriously as a young entrepreneur.

By Caron_Beesley, SBA Contributor

Are you a teenager or in your early 20s? Do you have a great business idea? Perhaps you’re already making headway towards starting your own business.

But how do you get others to believe in you and your business idea?

Here are eight surefire ways that you can be taken seriously as a young entrepreneur:  Continue reading

Ask SCORE | Need funding for your small business?

Small Business Administration loan programs might be the answer. 

Starting a small business takes time, hard work, and money. Depending on your type of business and your present financial situation, you may find you need to reach to outside sources for funding.

One resource you can turn to for assistance in obtaining a loan to start or grow your business is the United States Small Business Administration (SBA). While the SBA does not directly lend money to small businesses, it can facilitate loans with third party lenders. Various banks, credit unions, community development organizations, and microlending institutions throughout the U.S. partner with the SBA to provide funding to small businesses without access to other financing options with reasonable terms.

SBA sets specific guidelines for loans, which are made by its partners, and it guarantees that they’ll be repaid by the borrowers. This benefits small business owners by giving them access to much-needed funding, and it eliminates some of the risk to the lending partners.

To qualify for an SBA loan, your business must meet certain criteria regarding business size, financial standing, and others. You must also meet the credit qualifications of the lender.  Continue reading

Surety Bond Guarantee Program

The SBA’s Surety Bond Guarantee Program helps small and emerging contractors obtain bid, performance and payment bonds. The SBA guarantees up to 90% of a bond issued by a surety company for construction, service, supply and manufacturing contracts. To qualify as a small business an applicant’s annual receipts must meet the NAICS standard.

The Seattle Bond Office handles applications for bond guarantees on behalf of contractors domiciled in nine western states and thirteen southern states.

Learn more here… http://www.sba.gov/surety-bonds

Continue reading

Contract Opportunities for Service-Disabled Veterans

Small Business Concerns owned and controlled by service-disabled veterans has been established under The Veterans Bene ts Act of 2003 – Public Law 108-183. This act assists federal agencies in meeting the 3% veteran contracting goal.

Federal contracting of cers may now set-aside or award sole- source contracts to Service-Disabled Veteran Owned (SDVO) Small Business Concerns (SBC).

Eligibility:

  1. 51% or more owned by one or more service-disabled veterans.
  2. Management and daily business operations is controlled by one or more service-disabled veterans or the spouse of such veteran if the veteran is permanently and severely disabled.
  3. At the time of contract offer, an SDVO SBC is small as defined by the size standard corresponding to the NAICS code (13 CFR 121.201) assigned to the contract.

Small business concerns self-certify. You should obtain a letter from the VA certifying that you are a service-disabled veteran in the event another business protests your award.  Continue reading