Category Archives: News

Writing Content for Your Website

by Susan Shoemaker, Principal-Project Manager, Peninsula Web Design

The single most common challenge for creating a website is writing good content. Why is this an issue? We encounter this speed bump with almost every website project.

The written content of your website impacts the performance of your website. This is how both the search engines and users find you, and determine if you have what they want. For your website to produce results for your business it first has to be found, and then it must connect with the user, in order for that person to be inspired to reach out to you.

Writing content for a website takes effort.

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Win 4 months of free rent at the Kitsap Mall.

The Challenge: Battle of the Pop Ups

Kitsap Mall has a contest going until April 19th in which if a business is looking to start up in the mall — or a business is looking to expand into a second (or more) locations — they can enter to win 4 months free rent at the mall to get their business going. Submit your most innovative product, concept, or business strategy today for your  chance to win 4 months of free rent!

Kitsap Mall Contest

Does your business have an amazing story to share?

Small Business Grant Contest

Enter by March 25 to Expand Your Possibilities

Does your business have an amazing story to share? We want to hear it. The FedEx Small Business Grant Contest recognizes and rewards unique small businesses with grants up to $50,000.

Entering the contest is a chance to promote your business and get your fans excited to spread the word about you. It’s also a chance to become part of something bigger: a close-knit group of finalists and winners who support and share ideas with each other.

 

All Things Sales! 16 Mini-Lessons for Startup Founders

As a former CEO and software engineer (Citrix, XenSource, VERITAS, etc.), board member of GitHub (recently acquired by Microsoft), and lecturer in management at the Stanford Graduate School of Busines, a16z general partner Peter Levine is constantly asked “Why sales?” by entrepreneurs and technical founders. He himself used to hold the “engineer-centric” view that if you build a great product, customers will come. But the fact is, all world-class companies must have a strong sales force. So — how do they get there? How does a technical founder begin to build a top tier sales motion?

In this series of snack-sized videos — which you can watch all together, or mix-and-match for your particular questions and needs — Levine distills the fundamentals that every founder should know about sales. The 16 lessons in this “mini-MOOC” offer everything from definitions to concrete guidance for the following:

1. All Things Sales! 16 Mini-Lessons for Startup Founders [Introduction]

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Business Structure: Which works best for you?

business ownershipWhen you start a new business, one of the first decisions you’ll have to make is how to structure your company. This choice can be critical to the future health of your business. Taking time up front to consider the pros and cons of each possible structure will likely save you many headaches in the future. In certain cases, it can mean the difference between your business’s success or failure.

Below you’ll find the upsides and downsides to some common business structures: Sole Proprietorships, LLCs, C-corporations, and S-corporations.

Sole Proprietorship

Upside:

  • Easy to Form – Sole Proprietorships are the easiest, most common, and least expensive business structure. A person is essentially a walking, talking sole proprietorship in waiting. All you need to do is sell something—a product, a service, anything—and boom … suddenly you’re a sole proprietor. Aside from obtaining any required business licenses, a Sole Proprietorship requires no paperwork and no filing fees.
  • Decision Making – As suggested by the name, you are the sole decision-maker. You run your business the way you want to run your business, and you don’t have to ask permission from anybody.
  • Taxes – The IRS doesn’t view your Sole Proprietorship as a separate tax entity, so there’s no special or additional tax paperwork. You’ll simply file your taxes on the same 1040 form as any other individual.

Downside:

  • Liability – The lack of separation between you and your business leaves you liable for all debts and legal claims against the business. You can even be responsible for your employees’ actions (if you have employees) while they are on the job.
  • Funding – Sole Proprietorships lack a specific structure for raising funds. You have no stock to sell, no set percentages to offer, and banks are often reluctant to offer loans to sole proprietors. Continue reading