Category Archives: HR

A Step-by-Step Guide to Hiring Your First Employee

So You Want to Be the Boss?

Top 10 HR Issues: How to Avoid Common Pitfalls

What You Need to Know Before You Hire Your First Employee

If you’re thinking about hiring your first employee, you may be feeling so thinly stretched that you want to fill out paperwork and have someone start right away. That’s understandable, since adding staff to your small business can increase your ability to serve your customers. But if you’re not experienced at hiring and managing employees, it’s easy to make mistakes that can make it harder to serve as a consistent, fair boss.

Before you place your first ad for an employee, here’s what you’ll want to consider about the employer-employee relationship you’re about to embark on.

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Is it time to hire your first employee? Here’s how to know.

You’re running your own business, and you’re busier than ever. You don’t want to turn work away, but you’re already spread too thin. So you’ve started to wonder: Is it time to hire your first employee?

Becoming an employer is a big decision. You don’t want to hire staff unless it’s absolutely necessary.  But if you’re too swamped to keep up, your work will suffer, and you’ll lose the solid customer base you’ve worked so hard to build.

How to know when it’s time to hire.

Becoming a boss is a great idea if your business has grown enough to justify it. Make sure you’re hiring someone for the right reasons.  Continue reading

New overtime rules to affect businesses with annual gross sales of $500,000 or more.

According to Julie Tappero of West Sound Workforce,  4.1 million more workers in the U.S. will become eligible for overtime pay as of December 1, according to the Department of Labor. Of those, 76,000 workers will be in the state of Washington.

It’s estimated that this change will result in an extra $1.2 billion a year in earnings for workers. The reason for this is that the salary threshold for overtime exemption under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) is more than doubling, from $455 a week to $913 per week. This change will affect almost every business in the country.

Read more at the Kitsap Peninsula Business Journal website.

Shared Work Program Helping More Than 700 Washington Businesses

By Chad Pearson, State of Washington Employment Security Department Shared Work Program

sharedwork-slide1_cropWashington businesses big and small continue to avoid layoffs using the Employment Security Department’s Shared Work Program.

Even as Washington’s unemployment rate has dropped to nearly five percent, more than 700 businesses in the state continue to use the program. That’s because Shared Work can be helpful not only during a recession or uneven economic times, but also when a supplier’s delivery is delayed or a road construction project has disturbed traffic outside their business.

Washington’s program is so effective at preventing layoffs, the U.S. Department of Labor recently promoted it as a model for other states, encouraging them to set up their own programs.  Continue reading

Is your business taking a temporary downturn? Check out Washington’s Shared Work program.

Shared Work program – the smart alternative to layoffs

If you are facing a temporary decline in business, the Shared Work program offers you an alternative to laying off workers. Instead, you can reduce the work hours of your permanent employees, and the workers can collect partial unemployment benefits to replace a portion of their lost wages. This translates into immediate payroll savings and prevents the loss of your skilled employees. Watch the Shared Work video on YouTube to learn more!

A 2014 customer survey (PDF, 306KB) showed that the program is helping businesses stay afloat, and nearly 97 percent of participating employers would recommend Shared Work to other struggling businesses.  Continue reading