Category Archives: Borrowing Money

5 Things You Should Know About the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP)

1. There is more than $130 billion in PPP funding still available … and now, more flexibility too.

PPP funds are still available for small businesses, independent contractors, nonprofits and tribal businesses whose operations were impacted by the Coronavirus outbreak. And with the enactment of the Paycheck Protection Program Flexibility Act, there is more flexibility, such as the extension of time to spend loan proceeds from eight weeks to 24 weeks and the expansion in the percentage of funds that can be used for non-payroll expenses. Read more in this joint statement from SBA Administrator Jovita Carranza and U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin.

New PPP Flexibility 

2. The last date on which a PPP loan application can be approved is June 30, 2020.

While many extensions and flexibilities were enacted with recent legislation, one date still remains: the last day a PPP loan application can be approved is June 30, 2020. That means now is the time to apply for a PPP loan before time runs out. Find a PPP lender — or even review PPP materials in 17 languages — by visiting www.sba.gov/paycheckprotection.

Find a PPP lender

3. SBA Resource Partners can help you with the PPP application or loan forgiveness process.

Through webinars, virtual meetings and phone calls, business advisers from the SBA Resource Partner Network are helping small businesses navigate through the PPP process. Plus, they are working with businesses on their individual recovery plans. Connect with a SBA Resource Partner near you or one of the many other helpful resources from the Federal Resources for Small Business website.

Connect with an adviser

4. We want to know how the PPP has helped your business. 

We’ve been answering a lot of questions from businesses about the PPP process along the way. Now we want to hear the end result. Tell us your story of how the PPP has helped your business and your employees.

Tell us your story

5. Report fraud to the SBA Office of Inspector General.

While new programs are helping people through difficult times, unfortunately, it comes with new avenues for scams and fraud. If you suspect fraud on an SBA program or want to learn more about known scams and alerts, visit the SBA Office of Inspector General website.

Report fraud, waste or abuse 


From the SBA Pacific Northwest Regional Office

Congress Acts to Help Small Businesses

March 24, 2020

I know that these past few weeks have been challenging for many folks. The COVID-19 pandemic has undeniably impacted our economy, and this rings especially true for small businesses across our region. As someone who worked professionally in economic development before serving in Congress, I’ve always believed that small businesses are the backbone of our economy.

With that in mind, I strongly believe that Congress must take immediate action to support small business owners and their employees. I’ve taken action and wanted to share some helpful resources that small businesses like yours may find helpful.

As you may be aware, Congress authorized disaster loan assistance for small businesses in the first coronavirus response law. The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) provides low-interest, long-term disaster loans to small businesses, private non-profit organizations, homeowners, and renters to help meet financial obligations and operating expenses which could have been met had the disaster not occurred. Continue reading

SBA To Help Small Businesses Impacted by Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Up to $2 Million in Disaster Assistance Loans

SBA Administrator, Jovita Carranza, issued the following statement today in response to the President’s address to the nation:
“The President took bold, decisive action to make our 30 million small businesses more resilient to Coronavirus-related economic disruptions. Small businesses are vital economic engines in every community and state, and they have helped make our economy the strongest in the world. Our Agency will work directly with state Governors to provide targeted, low-interest disaster recovery loans to small businesses that have been severely impacted by the situation. Additionally, the SBA continues to assist small businesses with counseling and navigating their own preparedness plans through our network of 68 District Offices and numerous Resource Partners located around the country. The SBA will continue to provide every small business with the most effective and customer-focused response possible during these times of uncertainty.”

Is an SBA loan right for you?

SBA loan

If you’re starting or growing your small business, you should learn about loans guaranteed by the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) as a funding option.

If you apply for an SBA loan, your loan won’t be from the SBA, and you won’t make your payments to the agency. Instead, the SBA approves lenders to provide loans to small businesses under their loan programs. Continue reading

Nine Ways to Fund Your Business

by Kelly Deis of SoundPoint Consulting

If you don’t have the capital to fund your business growth, here are a few ideas. Which one is right for you?

1. Bank Loan or Line of Credit

Borrowing from the bank is probably the most traditional way of funding a business. This can take the form of a traditional loan or line of credit. Some banks may require an SBA guarantee which is a little more expensive than a bank-only loan. Others may require covenants, or conditions, within which the business must perform.

Bankers will review your historical performance and business plan in great detail. Assuming that these pass muster, the bank will require collateral in the form of inventory, equipment or even your house. In many cases they will insist on a personal guarantee.

Bank loans are debt financing requiring periodic payment of principal and interest. However, they do not require you to give up equity in your business; if your business takes off, you keep the profits (after debt repayment). Continue reading

How much cash should a small business keep in reserve?

piggy bank cashCash is the fuel that makes a business run. It is needed to pay salaries including your own, fund marketing programs to acquire and retain new customers, invest in equipment and facilities, pay rent, supplies and many more day-to-day activities. Most financial experts recommend three to six months of operating expenses, but using this for every business in every situation is misleading.

To determine how much cash you need, you must look at the following key areas.

How Much Cash Have You Been Using?

If you’re an established business owner, look at your monthly cash flow report (or go to the next paragraph if you’re a start-up). This report will provide an historical and seasonal perspective. Note the cash received from sales and the cash spent. The net of these two is often referred to as the “net burn rate.” For example, if you have $50,000 in sales and $30,000 in expenses, then your net burn is +$20,000

Your “gross burn rate” only takes cash expenditures into account; in our example, that’s $30,000 and is the more conservative amount, since it does not assume any sales are made. Historical spending patterns are a good starting point in considering future spending plans.  Continue reading

Where’s the Money?

10 Types of Small Business Financing and How to Qualify

Choosing the right financing option for your small business—and figuring out which ones you can get—can feel confusing or overwhelming.

This guide will help you understand ten popular types of financing often available to small businesses.

More importantly, it can help you understand which ones are available and appropriate for your business now.

Continue reading

Should your startup business get a loan?

approved small business loan applicationMany startup small business owners take pride in pulling themselves up by their bootstraps and not using financing to get their companies off the ground. But that approach can backfire, a new study in the Journal of Corporate Finance suggests.

The study, conducted by Florida Atlantic University faculty, assessed what happened to companies that took on debt during their first year of operation.

The authors discovered businesses that took on debt are more likely to succeed (as long as they use business debt as opposed to taking on personal debt).

What’s more, they’re also more likely to achieve higher revenues.  Continue reading